Tag Archives: ideas

Don’t Settle

One of our clients kindly allowed us to do a case study on their player development program because they had seen such success with their rolling 90-day prospecting program, we wanted to share it with the world. The property’s partnership with us enabled them to implement an idea their leadership thought would drive incremental revenue, and they saw a 25% increase due to this new program! (They even saw increased play among hosted players when unhosted carded play was down.) They chose not to settle for the status quo.

The key to their success is two-fold: (1) the team leader’s idea for identifying, contacting and creating loyalty among their players of interest utilizes a key strength among their hosts, and (2) their daily updates (to hosts, host manager, director and VP) ensure that they know exactly how things are progressing. There’s no waiting until IT or database can run a new set of reports, there’s no sorting through excel files to track host progress or identify players, therefore there’s no roadblock to putting a good idea to use and no need to settle.

For too many properties, it is difficult for a player development team leader to receive necessary information in a meaningful way or in a timely manner. Weekly reports mean that the leaders and their hosts won’t know every day how they are progressing to goal, so adjustments are difficult to make during the last month of a quarter…especially if they have to wait for a spreadsheet to be generated and sent via e-mail to be massaged into something useful. This struggle makes it difficult for the leader to properly manage a host team to drive the best possible numbers.

Like their leaders, host teams at lots of casinos take care of the regulars and the players with whom they are best acquainted, but rarely have the bandwidth or inclination to dig deeper into the new player data or reactivation lists to find worthy “new” guests who require their attention. When there are rooms or showroom seats to be filled, many hosts call the same folks who had come to the last show instead of finding new patrons to reward with the freebies. (Nick Ippolito of Player Development Systems, Inc. shared that in a recent survey conducted by his company, 90% of casino host respondents stated that they prefer talking with players they have met or already know.) Without the right support, there is little a team leader can do to motivate their hosts to do more.

Equally frustrating to many PD team leaders are the delays in getting host results at the end of a quarter. When the end of a quarter and the end of a week don’t line up (assuming that even weekly reports are the norm), the quarterly host report might seem to be an afterthought to the database team. So these PD pros often run reports and cobble together some numbers for themselves to find out they had missed achieving their theoretical goal by only a few thousand dollars.

It is not necessary, given the current resources available for Casino Player Development, to settle for weekly numbers or hosts who aren’t accomplishing all that they can. There are some properties with advanced teams who are putting up good numbers despite the fact that most gaming markets are not enjoying the same recovery that the rest of the economy seems to have. There are also many teams who are talking with the same guests and accomplishing the same things every day, not progressing or growing incremental revenue. Then, there are the teams who aren’t focused on driving revenue; they are glorified promotions attendants who work at the club or in the VIP lounge sometimes. This doesn’t have to be the case, however. Technology in the gaming world is growing in leaps and bounds, and some company somewhere has just the solution your property needs. Whether you purchase a server and install an enterprise edition or access the software via the internet, you can likely find something that will help your team drive more revenue, just like the property in our case study did. If it’s training you need, there are a number of great options available for that as well.

The BNP Media & Raving Casino Marketing & Technology Conference in 2015 will provide a golden opportunity for marketing and player development pros to find the resources they need to grow their incremental revenue. Since the technology conference will, for the first time, take place as part of the Casino Marketing Conference, gaming marketers will be able to find answers to most of their questions or concerns all in one place. Start with some basic research on the exhibitors, decide which ones may have the solution you need, then make an appointment to meet with the ones you’ve chosen during the conference (but be sure not to schedule over an important breakout session).

Don’t settle for getting information whenever database or IT can get it to you. Don’t let your PD team languish or miss goals by only a couple thousand dollars. Don’t wait to begin doing research to find the right software, consultant, or other solution for making your team more efficient, effective, and confident. Don’t spend another year wishing you had a casino marketing partner, more data, or the ability to bring your vision to life. Walt Disney famously said that if you can dream it, you can do it. He forgot to mention that you might need some help to pull it off…but he was right, in any case. Bring your dream player development program to life in 2015. You’ll be so glad you did. (And so will your boss!)

The Stanislavsky Method in Customer Service

Fall often brings reminiscing, at least for me, about cooler mornings and warm weekday afternoons in a classroom.  In my high school years, I was fascinated with acting and drama, so it’s no surprise that I thought back to those classes after getting the kids onto their respective buses this morning.  Happily, I remembered learning The Stanislavksy System (or Method)…and realized that it influenced my approach to customer service. (Cool, huh!?)

For those of you who never aspired to act, the Stanislavsky Method (known more commonly these days as “Method Acting”), was a huge departure from the 19th century approach to bringing characters to life on stage. Instead of the big, broad movements and exaggerated speech that had been the norm up to the turn of the century, Constantin Stanislavsky believed that a more natural-looking performance would be more believable and just as entertaining.  At its heart, his Method stressed that the actor must first be believed, an accomplishment even more important than being heard or understood.  He must have been on to something, since his Method is being taught in acting schools around the world today.

So, you’re asking, “What the heck does all this acting stuff have to do with Customer Service?”  I’ll answer your question with a question of my own.  Have you ever had to act your way through a customer service interaction?  Have you had to pretend to care, or hold your tongue because the guest in front of you was being unreasonable, or try to keep from laughing because the situation was so absurd?  Yes?  I thought so.  The Stanislavsky Method, applied to these situations, would be immensely helpful.

Here’s how the Method works:

  1. Ask the “Magic If.”  “If I were insert name or description of person here, what would I do?  This is helpful because it allows you to step outside yourself for a moment and find a different perspective for handling the situation.  You could put yourself in the guest’s shoes, channel your boss, a mentor, or your mom to find the right point of view with which to approach the situation.  (WWJD also applies in this step, but from a slightly different perspective.)
  2. Re-think how you move and talk.  This step could make or break your interaction with an upset guest. Letting your own negative emotions show can quickly escalate an already unpleasant situation.  Take a moment to check your body language, facial control, and tone of voice.  If you look and sound annoyed or inconvenienced, the guest will pick up those vibes and react accordingly.  Make a conscious effort to project positivity, confidence, and empathy.  The rest of the steps will support this effort.
  3. Observation; be a people watcher.  Actors are always looking for a way to get into the thought processes of their characters.  One way to accomplish this is to observe real people in their natural habitat and learn about different behaviors, interactions, and personalities.  There are multiple ways this powerful tool can be of help to those who deal with customers every day.  First, even without a guest in front of you, if you are paying attention, you can spot people who are on the cusp of an issue (people looking around for help, confused facial expressions, guarded body language) and sometimes avert disaster before it develops.  Additionally, while you are interacting with someone, paying attention to how they hold themselves and respond to you and others around them can be a powerful guide to handling them more appropriately.  Plus, you can learn from the examples others have provided in their customer service conversations and adapt their more successful strategies for yourself.
  4. Ask “What’s my motivation?”  Surely you’ve heard aspiring actor characters in pop culture asking this question of an acting coach or director.  It’s a great question for actors to ask, because understanding the reasons behind someone’s actions helps an actor get more deeply into the head of the character. The same is true for customer service.  If you understand WHY the guest is angry or frustrated or laughing hysterically, it’s easier for you to resolve the situation to that guest’s satisfaction.  Without an understanding of the motivation behind a behavior, you will have difficulty convincing the guest that you really care about their issue, and you’re taking shots in the dark to hit the right solution.
  5. Emotional memory.  If you’ve ever wondered how someone can cry on cue, this Method step may be the answer.  Clearly, actors sometimes have to transmit emotions that they may not actually feel. To display the appropriate emotion (whether you’re feeling it or not), channel a time when you did feel the emotion in question. Dredge up that memory and let the replay loop in your mind’s eye. You’ll start to feel it again, and it will show up in your expression, posture, gestures, and tone.  In customer service, use a memory of being helpful, in charge and successful.  Or, if you prefer, find a memory of poor service and “wear” that to empathize with your guest, then bring him back with you to a level playing field where you can work with one another to solve the dilemma you are now facing together.

Acting and customer service don’t have a lot in common at first glance, but the Method proves that there are effective steps to find the right approach almost any situation in which you need to convince someone that you are who you claim to be.  These steps, whether put together in this order or applied one at a time as needed, will help you to become a better, more empathetic advocate for your guests.  They will appreciate the time and energy you put into it, and you will grow from the experiences.  It’s a Win/Win!  (And how often does THAT happen in the casino industry?)

Casino Marketing Vendors to Treasure

Since joining the team at Harvest Trends, I have discovered that there is, sadly, no need for me to keep in regular contact with some of the vendors and their reps who made my life easier over the years.  This point was made clearer to me as I walked through the expo hall at the Southern Gaming Summit in May and the Casino Marketing Conference in 2014.  Even though I am no longer a customer to some of these folks, I was pleased to see some familiar faces at the booths.

Many of these people were instrumental to the success of some pretty big VIP events and player loyalty programs for which I was responsible, as their companies went above and beyond to ensure that everything went as smoothly as possible for my team, my guests, and me.  They don’t know I’m writing this about them.  They didn’t ask for this, nor did they have any input into this post.  They are, simply put, people and businesses who provided me great products and/or services and will, I’m sure, do the same for you.  The business name for each is also a link to the company’s website.  They’ll open in a new browser tab, should you have interest in any of them.IMG_1113

All-Star Incentive Marketing

All Star provides a wide variety of gift and giveaway items to its clients.  From high-end handbags to 4″ tall live plants, if they don’t have it already, I’m sure they can find it for you at a reasonable price. (…and if they don’t find it at a reasonable price, they will tell you what it will cost and offer alternatives!) At my last property, we did a couple of highly successful events with All Star at the ready.  They assisted us with a “choose-your-gift” event for our top rewards club tiers that exceeded all expectations.  How?  The initial list of items was quite impressive: good value for our spend and high perceived value for our guests (like Vera Bradley, Sunbeam, and Bluetooth). Then, once the selections were complete and event plans had been finalized, our sales rep came to the property to assist with the order-taking.   The guests got to touch samples of the items available, ask questions about them (Tim was really great with this part!), then choose which one they wanted to order for pick up (second trip!) on a pre-determined date.   I don’t know if this is something he does for all his clients, but Tim’s presence had a calming and reassuring effect on my nerves. He was super professional and super polite. I wouldn’t hesitate to do the exact same event with him again.

In addition to this fantastic giveaway, All Star came to us with some innovative ideas for point redemption programs, VIP and “regular” player giveaways, and everyday promotions and events. They were always honest with us about what we could expect in terms of price and delivery, supported their products without fail, and were responsive to our requests for more information or ideas. They even sent some of their executives to our property to meet with our marketing team in order to establish a stronger working relationship with us. It’s that kind of customer service that makes me recommend this company.

Integrity Events

Integrity Events helped me book entertainers for my showroom and New Year’s Eve event for a couple of years.  From corporate events and private parties with energetic cover-performing groups to big arenas with nationally known entertainers, these folks can help you find the right act(s) for your event or venue, and they can even help you with production services if you need them.  Lori was our contact, and she was fantastic.

Lori made it possible for me to book a couple of big-name artists I wouldn’t have been able to afford without her assistance.  How?  She knows her stuff and saw opportunities that I would have never known existed. She presented me with deals and options and straightforward advice that made my job so much easier than I could have ever imagined.  Her advice and suggestions were spot on, she never lost her patience with the decision-making process (that often took longer than I wanted it to) at the property level, and she did everything she could to provide us with the best entertainment value possible.

Entertainment is what Integrity Events does, and just like the name implies, they give you the honesty, respect, and service you deserve.  No matter what sort of event you’re planning, if it’s big enough to need live entertainment, Integrity Events is a great resource for finding the right act.

Pixus

As part of a cross-training exercise at my last casino property, I was responsible for traditional marketing for a few months (instead of “casino” marketing).  I had to oversee direct mail, advertising, promotions and events (again), property signage and messaging, and I took on an increased role in analysis and planning during that time.  Pixus was instrumental in my success during the training period, and about five years later, the property is still using my biggest Pixus purchase: a 6’x6′ magnetic game board.

I had contacted them initially to inquire about some signs we’d ordered from them.  Because I wasn’t their primary contact at the property, I wasn’t receiving notifications from their shipping folks.  While I was on the phone with Edna, she asked if there was anything else we needed, and she connected me with a sales rep (whose name I don’t recall) who sent me information on a handful of products they thought we might find useful.  As a result of this, I had some PhotoFab pumpkin pies made to alert buffet guests to a giveaway that was coming up, they produced a giant banner for my front entrance because our in-house large-format printer was down, and the magnetic game board they suggested has been in regular rotation since we bought it several years ago.

No matter what you need printed (even if you’re in a big hurry), no matter how big or small, and no matter what medium you choose, Pixus can get it done to your satisfaction.  They impressed me more than once.

Specialty House of Creation 

When I arrived at my last property, I learned that they usually purchased bungee cords approximately a quarter of a million at a time from this company.  They traveled, literally, on a slow boat from China, and they were the best ones I’d seen at the price point they’d negotiated.  (The slot machine bungee was my favorite.)  One of our shipments was subject to a customs delay, and the folks at SHC alerted us right away…with a solution!  Instead of just e-mailing their contact to tell her the bungees were going to arrive several weeks later than anticipated, they followed up with a call to ask how long our on-hand supply would last.  When we did the math and realized we’d run out of bungee stock before the delayed shipment arrived, Specialty House’s team suggested several alternatives which were readily available to imprint and ship, and at prices that didn’t make our finance team shout at us.

Once in 7 years we ordered bungees from another supplier instead of from SHC.  That was all it took to convince me.  The shipment we received was of inferior quality and the company we bought them from was apparently disinclined to even apologize for what we felt was a poor substitute for our usual product and follow-up service.

SHC carries a wide variety of promotional items, from keychains to t-shirts and everything in between.  If you can put a logo on it, they have it– or they can get it.  They’ve been supplying casinos with stuff for years…and everyone there is so much fun to talk with, you’ll feel like you’ve been their customer for years after only a few minutes.

Micro Gaming Technologies

At my last property, when we decided to stop handing out paper entries (and move into the 21st century with our promotions), MGT was the vendor we chose to provide us with automated drawing software.  While I wasn’t intimately involved with the selection process or the installation, I was mightily impressed with the finished product. My teams and I had to use MGT when we conducted drawings and announced promotional winners, and it was a very user-friendly and transparent experience.  The guests, who had some reservations about the change to electronic drawing drums, quickly came to appreciate the convenience and clearly random selection process for determining drawing winners.  Having the winners’ names appear on screens throughout the property eased our ongoing problem with communicating this important information to folks who were in the buffet line or who had visited the racetrack, and the associates in finance and analysis really liked the fact that we could quickly report on the number of participants and provide information related to the promotions in a much more timely manner than we’d been able to do before.

When we had issues of any kind, Bill and/or Wright were only a phone call away and were able to quickly resolve the problem in most cases.  They trained our staff thoroughly, provided ongoing support that gave us confidence in the product, and updates were always handled professionally with our fantastic IT team.  This kind of experience with a technology vendor can be difficult to find, but MGT delivers good service for a great product.

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Who are some of your favorite vendors for casino marketing products and services?  Tell us all about them in the comments section.

How a good host handles a “bad” guest.

Someone found this blog by searching the phrase, “how to reason with a casino host for comps.” As I’m sure you can imagine, I was pretty taken aback by this phrase. Having spent years in the industry, and having handed out millions of dollars in comps, it was clear to me that the player who Googled this has no idea how or why hosts issue comps in the first place. Like most casino guests, he thinks it’s all about him.

The first thing I wanted to tell this casino patron is that reasoning with a host isn’t the way to get a comp. Comps are based on play. Then it occurred to me that he’s undoubtedly heard this phrase before and is looking for advice on how to wheedle or cajole to get comps unwarranted by his play.

More importantly, what should a host (or any other player development pro) tell a guest who is trying to “reason” with him for a comp? The first thing you should do is establish the fact that the guest’s play should be the main consideration for any discretionary comps you may issue. In my years in the industry, I’ve heard so many of their reasons for believing they deserve a comp that this became my mantra.  “We issue comps based on play.” Repeat it. Say it in different ways if you need to.  “Your play doesn’t support the comp you’ve requested.” “Have you played yet?” Always bring it back to the play.

Next, tell the guest how much he or she needs to play in order to warrant the comp they’re asking you to give them. As Raving Service’s Steve Browne says, “You’re not negotiating the comp. You’re negotiating the guest’s play.” If your property has a blind discretionary comp system, equate the theo to points based on the guest’s past play history and give him a point threshold which will bring him to a level that will earn the comp he wants. That way, the burden is shifted to him.

Then, monitor and issue only what the play warrants.  If he needs to earn 1000 points to get the free room, he has to earn 1000 points to get the free room.  Don’t give it to him for 900, offer a discounted rate instead.  Stand by your word.

Sure, it’s tough to withstand the barrage of reasons the guest will throw at you in order to wear you down and get what he wants. But know this: if it works, he’ll do it again and again.

“It’s your anniversary? Great! Here’s ‘the tier benefit for that occasion’.”  (Alternatively, here’s a greeting card with an offer for your next visit. Or maybe a free dessert.)

“You had a tough day at the slots? I’m so sorry the machines weren’t being very forgiving today. Can I make you a dinner reservation (or walk you to the head of the buffet line) so you can take a meal break?”

“The cocktail server didn’t make it to you in a timely manner? Would you like a bottle of water? I’ll be happy to bring it to you right here.”

As always, be polite. As usual, you should follow the rules and guidelines when issuing comps for any reason.Should you make the decision to issue a comp despite my suggestions to the contrary, be crystal clear with the guest when you explain things. Before you hand over the voucher, make eye contact and say something to let him know exactly why you decided to issue the comp and that you want him to know how much you value his business.Let him know you appreciate his loyalty and clarify whether or not you are likely to issue similar comps in the future. Make sure he understands that you are making a rare exception for him because you are his host.

The bottom line is this: if the comp is warranted by play, then comp away.  But when something other than play becomes the issue, a comp is probably not the best solution. Use your creativity to come up with an alternative that is appropriate to the reasons the guest has presented when asking you to give them a comp Handling such requests using this rule of thumb will prevent you from creating unreasonable expectations. And just as you always should, use your best judgment.

10 Tips for Casino Hosts

A couple of recent e-mails from casino hosts gently pointed out that many of my blog posts are aimed squarely at those who lead casino player development teams and that there wasn’t a lot of content for those who actually ARE casino hosts.  With this post, I am addressing casino hosts directly in order to help them streamline their efforts to drive more visits from their property’s most profitable players.  The following guidelines may be applied as needed in order to help hosts accomplish more during a shift.

  1. Understand who your customers are and what they want.  This sounds pretty simple, but is , in fact, as complex as each of the players themselves.  Think for a moment about the things you hear over and over again in conversations with your players.  These are common themes, and it’s likely that your players have discussed their feelings about your program with one another as well.  Are they getting more free play from your competitors?  Since there’s not much you can do about that, remind them that you provide them extra “value” for their visits by making it easier for them to make room or dinner reservations.  Do they tell you that they don’t like your promotions?  Get specifics and pass them along to the pertinent associates in your marketing department in order to provide those folks the direction they need to make those promotions more appealing, which makes them more profitable when better players participate.  Talk with the [layers and share what you ‘ve learned in order to keep your casino ahead of the curve.
  2. Know how to say “no” and make it sound like “yes.”  This concept suggests that you can share with them what they need to do in order to get what they want.  Rather than shut them down as soon as they ask for something not warranted by their play, tell them how much they’ll have to play in order to earn the thing they want.  Remember to look at spouse play or other mitigating factors (how frequently they customarily visit, whether they likely visit competitor properties, recent illnesses or bad weather, etc.) in your calculations.  Then tell them how many points or trips or comps they will have to earn (or make) to qualify.  Put the ball back in the player’s court, so to speak, and then the “no” doesn’t have to be spoken.  Empower the guest to earn what’s necessary to have their wish fulfilled.
  3. Understand how your property’s direct mail program works.  This single accomplishment will enable you to more profitably manage your player list.  If the guest has hotel coupons that haven’t yet been redeemed, offer to make the reservation for them using the coupon.  (If your property requires that the actual coupon be surrendered upon check-in, remind the guest to bring it to the hotel desk.)  When the guest asks for a steakhouse reservation, look at their offers and determine whether they want this meal in addition to what their coupons provide and decide if the comp is warranted on top of the other offers they might redeem during the trip.  If they’ve got an offer for 2 (two) show tickets and they want 4 (four) seats for an upcoming show, look at recent play to see if the add-on is warranted.  (Maybe they had a big loss since the offers mailer…or maybe they didn’t.)  Understanding your mail program helps you better address player concerns when their offers change, too.  And you’ll get that question a lot.
  4. Make breaking (or bending) a rule a last resort.  Once you’ve broken a rule to accommodate a guest’s wishes, you’ve actually established a new rule.  The guest will likely come to expect a similar accommodation in the future unless you tactfully communicate to him that this is a one-time only situation.  As other players hear about the special favor you’ve done (and they will!), some of them are likely to ask you for similar consideration due to their own extenuating circumstances.  It can be a slippery slope, so it’s probably best to avoid the trip down the hill.
  5. Pass along player comments to your team leader.  Whether you know it or not, your team leader is probably going to follow up on the information you share.  Often, managers and directors are so busy with the day-to-day tasks of their own jobs, as well as the occasional firefight, that they don’t get to talk with guests and learn what is important or vexing to them.  In your role as a host, players will often share their frustrations or delights with you.  Close the feedback loop by sharing this information with your boss in order to ensure the guests concerns are at least within his awareness.
  6. Always maintain confidentiality.  It may seem like a no-brainer, but it’s easy to forget who is around you when you are speaking with co-workers or even other guests.  If you are going to be talking about specific player patterns or proprietary company information, always ensure you are in an area away from guests as well as employees who do not have access to the information you are sharing.  Never reveal things like ADT ranges or levels, customer losses, company policies and procedures, or sensitive information like room numbers or addresses.  When speaking with a customer directly, use generalizations or anecdotes to share pertinent information without going into specifics…unless you are talking about that guest’s own play patterns.  Even then, only use points or another metric which the customer can plainly see for himself to make your point.
  7. Never let ’em see you sweat!  Even when you’re running around the casino like a madman on a Saturday night, take your time to walk through the gaming areas, keeping in mind that the guests may take a cue from your behavior.  Walk with a purpose, but like you own the place.  Even when you’re on your way to a firefight, take advantage of opportunities to briefly “touch” players you know and make a mental note to get back to them when you have a moment.  Be calm and plan your next move instead of being buffeted by the tides of a busy casino floor.  Better yet, plan your day ahead of time.  Build in a buffer to accommodate the unexpected, and you’ll accomplish more.
  8. Don’t come out of the gate with an offer.  When you approach those players on the gaming floor, or when you reach one by phone, don’t automatically offer free play or a buffet comp.  Player development is about relationships, and it isn’t your job to be Santa Claus.  Talk with the guest.  Learn why he visits your property instead of a competitor’s.  Find out why he doesn’t like the buffet or never brings his wife with him.  Make a connection instead of an offer.  When you do this via telemarketing, you’ll often find that the overdue or inactive guest will make a visit to your property within a couple of weeks even if you didn’t sweeten the deal with something extra in the way of perks.  Just having you as their host will often keep your property top of mind, so touching base will sometimes generate a visit on its own.
  9. Share your ideas.  One of the best hosts I’ve ever known is also once of the most creative people I’ve met in my lifetime.  She is great at decorating, throwing parties, and generating ideas for casino promotions that drive revenue.  Fortunately, she is also a “sharer.”  She’s put together game shows, suite parties with hors d’ouvres and an open bar, slot tournaments, and countless other engaging events for her coded players.  She included other hosts in these events when they were interested, and they worked together to make the events memorable.  At the suite parties, they even set up a photo “booth” and took pictures with their players.  Those photos were featured at future events to show those who’d missed the parties just how much fun they’d had.   The hosts who opted out of participating in these events generally didn’t drive as much revenue in the same time period, and all of these great ideas were profitable.  Brainstorm with the creative minds at your property and provide your coded players another reason to come have fun at your casino.
  10. Never forget who you work for and who provides the dollars in your paycheck.  These entities are not one and the same.   You work for the casino, but the players provide the dollars in your paycheck.  It can create a balancing act for you, because sometimes what the player wants is at odds with what the company says you can provide.  Making sound business decisions is the hallmark of a good casino host.  Therefore, you must always balance the guest’s needs with the company’s success.  Paying a player to patronize your casino is never a good idea, because you haven’t actually secured their loyalty…and that’s ultimately what your job really is.

Being a good casino host takes a lot of varied skills.  You have to be a god communicator, both written and verbal.  You have to quickly weigh circumstances and crunch numbers to make decisions, the results of which your players will take personally.  You have to develop real working relationships with people around the casino to help you meet your guests’ needs in addition to the relationships you’ll need to build with the guests themselves.  You have to be ever mindful of the policies, procedures, regulatory concerns, ethical considerations and other guidelines by which you have to conduct your business.  While thinking like an entrepreneur, to manage your book of business, you have to abide by the rules your casino has for reinvesting in its players.  Often, you’ll have to do this on the fly without access to all the tools available to you, do it in addition to other tasks, or do it with so much data you can’t wade through it all.  It’s not a job for the faint of heart.

But you are a people person, and likely have casino player development in your blood, like I do.  That means you’ll come back again and again in an effort to get your guests to do the exact same.  7K0A0246

Casino CRM: What’s on your wish list?

Not long ago, I (triumphantly!) found a document for which I’d been searching.  During my years in Casino Player Development, I’d searched for a contact management system that did everything a host team would need it to do in order to best manage the casino’s high rollers.  I’d written my wish list to address the perspectives of the hosts, the player development team leader and the property.

I’m sharing my wish list here because Harvest Trends is THISCLOSE to completing development work on our first version of the CRM we’ve built specifically for Casino Player Development.  I searched for this product for more than a decade, as I’ve shared in this blog post and this one, too.  What features for Casino CRM are on YOUR wish list?

From a host’s perspective, the CRM should:

  • Allow quick data entry and quick review of past contacts both by player and by user
  • Provide a detailed player snapshot, including things like player worth and visit history, interests, bookings, preferences, and associations with other players
  • NOT restrict hosts from viewing one another’s players to enable them to tag-team problem resolution and bookings
  • Be flexible enough to reflect changes in programs, lists, and offers
  • Provide views to progress in terms of bookings, goal achievement, player frequency, faders, inactives, new players, etc. based on individual host and/or player parameters
  • Generate a “tickle” when a player needs to be contacted for any reason, to include birthdays, anniversaries, frequency drops, tagged events, and user-set parameters (e.g.: “call back with confirmation”, “call in XX days”, “send a Get Well card”)
  • Notify the host when certain events occur with coded players
  • Be flexible in use on the floor, in the office, or on a mobile device
  • Be quick to load, update, and accept input

From a management perspective, the CRM should:

  • Be easy to use to boost user adoption and acceptance
  • Provide insights related to host contacts and the effects of those contacts on player activity
  • Allow identification of “Players of Interest”  to include faders, inactives, new players of worth, and others as defined by the property
  • Include a dashboard or daily flash to show individual and team progress to goal (pace), achievement of assigned tasks, contacts, and success in responses to tickles and other notifications
  • Generate Top 20 (or 50 or 100) lists for Players of Interest based on property parameters
  • Allow for the assigment of tasks and follow-ups on the same
  • Automatically update and e-mail standard reports and updates to specific parties each day, week, month or quarter

From a property perspective, the CRM should:

  • NOT require extensive resources to keep running smoothly
  • Inspire confidence in its ability to provide timely and accurate direction and information
  • Be readily adopted by any and all users
  • Come with reliable training and support

Now, Player Development pros, tell me what I missed.  Comment with features or elements that I didn’t include on MY wish list…things that are on YOURS.

HT ipad

Do Rainy Days and Mondays Get YOU Down?

The prevalence of Monday-themed memes on social media would suggest that many people dread the arrival of another work week.  If you work in the world of casino gaming, your “Monday” may well fall on another day of the week, but the question remains: Do you, too, feel despondent over the prospect of returning to the weekly grind?

As a matter of fact, a quick Google search…well, a picture is worth a handful of words:

Mondays1

In a study published in the UK in 2011, Marmite(?!) found that Mondays are so depressing that many people won’t crack a smile before 11:00 am.  Nearly half of us are destined to be late for work on Monday mornings.  As Google autofill suggests, Mondays suck.

But that begs the question…Why?  The study’s authors opined that our collective slow start upon the return to work is a throwback to our tribal instincts.  We feel the need to re-connect with our co-workers after being apart from them over the weekend, and thus spend the morning hours in common areas of our workplaces commiserating over how much we dislike the return to work after the relative freedom of our two days off.

But, if you are a Casino Player Development professional, connecting with people is your stock – in – trade.  It’s what you do.  So you can’t let “Mondays suck” become a time suck at the beginning of your work week.  The impact this will have on your productivity is likely to depend on your specific shift(s) and days off, but it’s safe to assume that you can’t lose half your first shift every week to reconnect with the people you missed while you were away.  Or is it?

In fact, the study suggests that those who participate in the “tribal bonding” at the beginning of the week are better prepared for productivity, while those who start their Monday with gusto are more likely to burn out before the week is up.  Spend the time at the beginning of your first shift of the week connecting with people.  Have a plan.  Target a certain group of people each week and put your innate programming to work for you instead of pulling against it.  Don’t forget to include relationships other than those with guests, too.  Just the same way you would segment players, break down your working relationships and include a few of these in your weekly bonding time.  Whether you do it by department or some other way, make the effort to build and maintain relationships with people of at levels and responsibilities across your property.  Make 10 guest calls, then leave your desk and hit the floor.  Talk to guests and associates as you go, then go back to the office and crank out some more calls.  Now, you’re all better.  Right?

Alternatively, you can proactively get the Mondays out of your system.  The study has some ideas for a pick-me-up to banish your doldrums before you arrive at work.  They are:

  1. Watch TV
  2. Have sex
  3. Shop online
  4. Buy chocolate or makeup
  5. Plan a vacation

Make sure you don’t indulge in any of those activities at work, okay?

 

6 Event Ideas for Casino Player Development

Who hasn’t been there, right?  You’ve found yourself  sitting in a meeting or in front of your computer trying to come up with an idea for a thing to do to move the needle.  The solution, if you work in casino player development, often involves putting together a plan for bringing people through the doors of your casino.  Increasing player visits and/or the amount those guests play is, after all, the primary function of a host team.  Here are a few tried and true events or games that you can freely borrow (or modify or giggle over) for use in bringing your best players to see you.   Enjoy!

  • Who can earn the most points?  A competition.  This is a perfect (non) event for those big players who aren’t interested in gatherings or elaborate meals; you know, the ones who just want to play.  Select a group of good players and a time frame during which you want to drive some extra play, then communicate The Points Challenge to those players.  The player who earns the most base points during the time frame you’ve designated WINS!  Pros: drives revenue from good players, not very labor intensive, has an “exclusivity” factor, doesn’t have to be expensive.  Cons: no excitement factor, only moves a small group of players, requires timely database or IT support.
  • Come find me and choose your prize.  I’d like to meet you.  Not so much an event as a “dialogue,” this works fabulously for hosts who have players they’ve never met face to face.  Set a time frame and communicate to the host’s players that if they find him on the gaming floor during that time frame they can choose an envelope which contains a prize.  Print up a variety of prize vouchers, and have the host randomly put them into envelopes, several of which he can carry on his person as he walks the gaming floor during the specified time frame.  Things to decide: the prize pool, expiration dates of the offers, whether the host may “reluctantly” allow the guest to exchange his prize for something else if he isn’t happy with his lot, and whether players may play more than once during the event.  Pros: gets hosts face to face with guests, hosts are visible on the gaming floor, they can also be tasked with sign-ups and working the high-limit areas during the envelope time frames, other guests see and are intrigued.  Cons: hosts aren’t on the phones while they are on the floor, difficult to communicate prize pool to potential participants to incent visitation, other guests see and can’t participate, some “wasted” productivity is a possibility.
  • Choose your prize, social edition.  Choose a varied group of players and send an invitation for a cocktail party (or ice cream social or cigar party or whatever works in your market) and let the guests know that each of them will have an opportunity to choose a prize at the event.  Theme is important for this event, as it will determine the method by which patrons will choose a prize.  Is it St. Patrick’s Day?  Have the guest draw a chocolate coin from a plastic cauldron.  Are you closer to Easter?  Have them choose a plastic Easter Egg.  In mid-Spring, put fake money on a fake tree and have guests choose a “leaf.” The possibilities are endless.  Every choice wins the player a minimum prize of some sort (think $5 value), but some choices are specially marked (with a number or a colored sticker) to award a bigger prize.  Celebrate the big winners, so people know the prizes are being won and to create excitement.  Pros: volume can drive revenue, hosts are interacting with guests, guests interact with one another, everyone wins.  Cons: labor-intensive, can be expensive (depending on F&B and labor costs) and revenue flow-through may suffer if volume isn’t solid.
  • Win a prize, game show edition. This, too, has many variant possibilities, and can be as expensive and elaborate as you want to make it.  Choose your game and emcee, theme and prizes, then use your per person cost to determine the list of invitees.  This is a good opportunity to invite guests who are about to level up, who might level out, or those you haven’t seen in a while.  Go all out and produce a Dealmaker show where guests dress up and choose from among several hidden prize options, or have a Price-a-Rama where they have to play a game to see what they’ve won.  Video games work well, too.  Use your imagination!  Pros: high excitement level, generates buzz, creates interaction with and among guests.  Cons: requires tons of planning, can be expensive, takes players (and staff) off the floor for a while.
  • Choose a gift gathering.  A double-tripper.  Decide who you’re going to invite and how much you want to spend on each gift.  Put together a selection of gift items in that price range (look for high perceived value and low actual cost, obviously), then prepare an order form to be given to each guest at your event.  Have a few samples of each item available, and send an invitation for guests to come to the property to make a selection on a specified date and time.  At the gathering, guests can touch and feel the gifts, schmooze with your staff, and order the item of their choosing, knowing what day to come back (a second trip!) and pick it up.  Decide whether there will be a wide or narrow window for ordering and for pick-up, and whether hosts will be allowed to “hold” items for a later visit if good players can’t make it in during the scheduled time.  Pros: staff/player interaction, guest choice and goodwill, two trips per player.  Cons: requires tons of planning, labor-intensive, could get expensive, leftover items need storage/disbursement.
  • Sit-down dinner.  A conversation starter.   If you have a steakhouse, close it and host a private party for your very best players.  If not, arrange with your F&B team to put together a nice dining experience and invite your best players.  Assign seating in advance using your hosts’ knowledge of the guests and include a property executive at each table.  Have some questions prepared in advance in case the conversation doesn’t flow naturally, and use this dinner as both a revenue driver and an opportunity to learn what motivates and aggravates your top 20%.  Pros: everyone has a nice dinner, guests feel important, great learning opportunity.  Cons: can be expensive, takes players and execs out of commission for a while, issues may arise that the execs cannot speak to or address.  (Don’t make any promises!)

There are more where these came from.  If you have a suggestion or want to ask about additional ideas, please comment below.  If you have executed any of these, sound off and let us know how it went!